Western University of Health Sciences Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences Western University of Health Sciences
Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences

Biomedical News

GCBS researchers identify new mechanisms in learning and memory

GCBS team published a study that adds new pieces to the puzzle of how we learn. The paper is titled “Calpain-2-mediated PTEN Degradation Contributes to BDNF-induced Stimulation of Dendritic Protein Synthesis,” by Victor Briz, Yu-Tien Hsu, Yi Li, Erin Lee, Xiaoning Bi, and Michel Baudry. Click here to view the paper, which was published in the March 6, 2013 edition of The Journal of Neuroscience.

The study builds on 30 years of work by Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences Dean Michel Baudry, PhD. The paper tests the hypothesis that calpain activity is required for BDNF-stimulated local protein synthesis, a key step in the molecular mechanism underlying learning and memory. Click here to read the full story.


Dr. Guru Betageri, Ph.D. receives AAPS Fellowship

Dr. Guru Betageri, Ph.D., is currently Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Associate Dean, with the Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences. He received the honor of Fellow and was recognize for his outstanding contributions which elevate the stature of the pharmaceutical sciences, and for his professional excellence in fields relevant to the mission of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientist. This award for his professional competence is reflected through scholarly and research contributions to the pharmaceutical sciences such as original articles and scientic presentations at Annual Meetings and/or patents.

His research expertise included liposome, proliposome and lipid based drug delivery systems. Dr. Betageri is an inventor of the “Proliposomal” technology and has been awarded four U.S. patents. He has co-authored a book entitled “Liposome Drug Delivery” and contributed to several book chapters. He serves as a member of several professional societies and is a charter member of AAPS. Dr. Betageri served as an advisor/co-advisor to 20 M.S./Ph.D. students, and a thesis committee member for more than 30 students. For the full story, continue reading more…


GCBS research team uncovers new candidate for industrial biocatalysis

A new study led by WesternU Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences Assistant Professor Manal A. Swairjo, PhD, describes the discovery of the atomic structure of the only nitrile reductase known in biology, which has potential widespread applications in the chemical industry.
The paper, “Structural Basis of Biological Nitrile Reduction,” by Chikwana VM, Stec B, Lee BW, de Crecy-Lagard V, Iwata-Reuyl D, Swairjo MA, was recently published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Click here to read the full story.

Dr. Swairjo also had a recent publication in the Journal of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, “Fluorescent Fatty Acid Transfer from Bovine Serum Albumin to Phospholipid Vesicles: Collision or Diffusion Mediated Uptake.” Click here to view the publication.


Dr. Manal Swairjo, Ph.D. receives NSF grant

The National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded a continuing grant to the collaborating labs of WesternU Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences Assistant Professor Manal Swairjo, PhD, and Professor Dirk Iwata-Reuyl from Portland State University (PSU) for the project, “Mechanism and Structure in an Enzyme Superfamily.” The funding amount to WesternU is $137,401. The award is effective July 15, 2013 and continues for three years. This is a continuing grant which has been approved on scientific/technical merit.

The project focuses on elucidating the molecular/structural basis for the divergent chemistries exhibited by several members of the tunneling fold (T-fold) superfamily of enzymes involved in the biogenesis of transfer-RNA (tRNA). For the full story, continue reading more…


GCBS faculty receives intramural grant

GCBS Assistant Professor Manal A. Swairjo, PhD, received an intramural grant for the project, “New Anti Folate Antibiotics for Drug Resistant Infections.” The major goal of the project is to develop GTP cyclohydrolase IB, a bacteria-specific enzyme, as a molecular target for new antibiotics to combat drug resistant infections such as multi-drug resistant Staph (MRSA) and the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea.


GCBS research team uncovers new candidate for industrial biocatalysis

A new study led by WesternU Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences Assistant Professor Manal A. Swairjo, PhD, describes the discovery of the atomic structure of the only nitrile reductase known in biology, which has potential widespread applications in the chemical industry.

The paper, “Structural Basis of Biological Nitrile Reduction,” by Chikwana VM, Stec B, Lee BW, de Crecy-Lagard V, Iwata-Reuyl D, Swairjo MA, was recently published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Click here to read the full story.

Dr. Swairjo also had a recent publication in the Journal of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, “Fluorescent Fatty Acid Transfer from Bovine Serum Albumin to Phospholipid Vesicles: Collision or Diffusion Mediated Uptake.” Click here to view the publication.


MSBS graduate, Jonathan Alvarez, earns STARS research award

Graduate College of Biomedical Sciences MSBS graduate, Jonathan Alvarez earned STARS Award at WesternU’s fifth annual Student Technology and Research Symposium (STARS) on Aug. 1, 2012, for his research presentation on the biochemical analysis of t6A biosynthesis enzyme complex, a study he has been conducting toward his Master degree in biomedical sciences under the supervision of GCBS Assistant Professor Manal A. Swairjo. For more on this event click here.


FACE: Faculty for Autism Collaboration

GCBS faculty take part in campus-wide organization FACE: Faculty for Autism Collaboration and Education. Website: http://www.westernu.edu/face.

The goal of this inter-professional team of educators, clinicians and researchers is to promote integrated perspectives, activities, and resources that serve to enhance the lives of individuals with ASD and their significant others, to help optimize function and promote the highest possible quality of life. Click here to read the full story.