Western University of Health Sciences Interprofessional Western University of Health Sciences

Phase 2

From the WesternU Catalog:

IPE 6100 is the second of two semester-long courses required for most second-year health professional students enrolled at WesternU (including both Pomona and Lebanon campuses.)  It builds upon the knowledge, skills, and behaviors developed in IPE 5000, IPE 5100, and IPE 6000 and emphasizes collaboration in an asynchronous and mostly written format. All course work is completed online, besides one small team face-to-face capstone activity toward the end of the semester.

In Phase 2 of the IPE program at WesternU, students use the professional consultation process to examine how to organize, deliver, and ensure safe and high quality care through written communications among health professionals.

This course is required for second-year students from eight of our health professional programs: osteopathic medicine (Lebanon and Pomona campuses), optometry, dental medicine, podiatric medicine, veterinary medicine, physical therapy, nursing, pharmacy. In this course each of the five chronic disease topics is comprised of 8 separate cases. These cases are often delivered in written, audio, and video format.

Students receive a case written for their scope of practice by a clinician from their program, in which the patient’s needs require the consultation expertise of 2 – 4 other health professionals. Then they write a letter to the health professional of their choice, using team-based communication tools such as SBAR (TeamStepps).

After students have submitted their letters, they participate in peer review on letters written by students of a different profession (who received a different case). They will evaluate the letter on its clarity, conciseness and effectiveness in communication. Lastly, students complete a self-reflection on their experiences in the case and correspondence.

By the end of the academic year, students will acquire skills at writing and responding to written consultation requests across the health professions, and practice giving and receiving peer feedback, which are invaluable skills in the medical field.