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Joe Bertone, DVM, MS, DACVIM


Professor, Equine Medicine

College of Veterinary Medicine

E-Mail: jbertone@westernu.edu

Phone: 469-5529 |

Education

MS, Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 1987
DVM, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 1983
 

Professional Experience

•08/03-present: Professor, Equine Medicine. College of Veterinary Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA.
•10/03-present: Adjunct Professor. California Polytechnic Institute, Pomona CA.
•03/02: AVMA Council on Biologic and Therapeutic Agents.
•08/98â “05/00: Equine Internist and Regulatory Consultant. Idaho Equine Hospital, 16080 Equine Drive, Nampa, ID 83687.
•03/94-07/98: Veterinary Medical Officer. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine, HFV-114, 7500 Standish Place, Rockville, MD 20855
•03/94-07/98: Equine Internist. Equine Medical Consultant, 3815 Baker Valley Road, Frederick, MD 21071. Monacacy Equine Veterinary Associates, Mouth of Monacacy Rd, Beallsville, MD 20839
•11/89-03/94: Assistant Professor, Equine Medicine and Surgery. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, the Ohio State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210
•1988: Board certification, Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine - Washington, DC
•07/87-01/90: Assistant Professor. Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences
Affiliate member. Department of Physiology and Toxicology, Louisiana State University, School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
•May 1987: MS, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Fort Collins, CO
•07/84-06/87: Resident, Large Animal Medicine. Colorado State University, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Fort Collins, CO 80523
•May 1983: DVM, New York State College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
•05/82-05/83: Large Animal Clinical Student Internship. New York State, College of Veterinary Medicine Large Animal Clinic, Ithaca, NY l4853

Philosophy

Education needs to be exciting, engaging and interesting for the student as well as the faculty member. Education is no longer about handing out notes and lecturing, it's about giving students the tools to learn long after they leave veterinary school. Student centered learning is the key to life-long learning. Education is successful when all students know more than their teachers.

Research Interest

Dr. Bertone is interested in areas of pharmacology and physiology that directly affect clinical veterinary medicine and the health of horses. His preference is that these areas be investigated with spontaneous disease in clinical cases. He is also interested in developing new teaching methods for students that increase learning by practice without risk to animals.